John Locke, Reason, Christianity And Christmas

Por Alejandro Chafuen: Publicado el 20/12/18 en: https://www.forbes.com/sites/alejandrochafuen/2018/12/23/john-locke-reason-christianity-and-christmas/#13ed81fd66b3

 

Over the course of the last five years, I have been devoting my Christmas article to authors or topics that touch upon the birth of Jesus of Nazareth and are relevant to the free society and a free economy. This Christmas, I focus on John Locke (1632-1704), one of the most celebrated champions of human liberty.

Although he studied Christianity for most of his life John Locke wrote his two major books on the topic during his last decadeALEJANDRO CHAFUEN

George Santayana (1863-1952), the noted philosopher, started a lecture by saying that a good portrait of Locke “should be painted in the manner of the Dutch masters, in a sunny interior, scrupulously furnished with all the implements of domestic comforts and philosophical enquiry: the Holy Bible open majestically before him, and beside it that other revelation—the terrestrial globe.” Victor Nuovo, who edited a book of most of Locke’s writings on religion, wrote that “no other philosopher except Aristotle has had such an impact on the common mind.” Nuovo concluded that a “careful reading of his theological writings shows that he viewed the world in terms of biblical sacred history that began with the angelic rebellion and would end with the Last Judgement.”

John Locke spent his life trying to understand the human person and spent several decades, especially the last one of his life, trying to better understand Christianity. He did not just study religion; he also lived it. When he was no longer able to go to church, he thought it proper to receive the sacrament at home. His biographers state that he spent his time in “acts of piety and devotion,” exhorting those at his bedside that this life should only be regarded as a preparation for a better one.

One of these biographers, Howard R. Penniman (1916-1995), wrote that Locke’s book The Reasonableness of Christianity (1695) and still more his Paraphrase and Notes on the Epistles of St. Paul(1705-1707) “were among the earliest examples of modern Biblical criticism produced by an adherent of Christianity.” J.R. Milton, a contemporary Locke scholar at King’s College, London, wrote that Locke’s Paraphrase “was the culmination of a lifetime’s study, not a late intellectual deviation.”

Locke considered that every well-educated young person should study the works of Hugo Grotius (1583-1645), Samuel von Pufendorf (1632-1694) and Richard Hooker (1554-1600). These were all Protestants who had read the Catholic late scholastics. Hooker was especially influenced by the writings of Thomas Aquinas. Locke also studied other works by Catholic authors such as Natural and Moral History of the Indies (1590) by Father José de Acosta (ca. 1540-1600). Some of Acosta’s views might have influenced Locke’s view on toleration, as when Acosta concluded that “there are no peoples so barbaric that they do not have something worthy of praise, nor are there any people so civilized and humane that they stand in no need of correction.” There were exceptions to Locke’s view about tolerance, however. In his view God was so important that his call for tolerance did not extend to atheists.

Maurice Cranston (1920-1993) wrote in a book on Locke that he “believed that Reason was God’s voice in every man: hence, for Locke, there could be no real conflict between reason and faith.” Locke lamented the divide between priests and philosophers: “The priests, that delivered the oracles of heaven, and pretended to speak from the gods, spoke little of virtue and a good life. And, on the other side, the philosophers, who spoke from reason, made not much mention of the Deity in their ethics. They depended on reason and her oracles, which contain nothing but truth, but yet some parts of that truth lie too deep for our natural powers easily to reach and make plain and visible to mankind without some light from above to direct them.” Among the 20th century’s political philosophers, it was F.A. Hayek (1899-1992) who cautioned most strongly about the limits of reason and the importance of tradition and religion.

Locke made an effort not only to understand those things that are more readily understood by reason, but also the supernatural. It is actually hard to read any work by Locke that does not bring up God or the Bible. In Some Thoughts Concerning Education, for example, he not only recommends that children should read the Bible but also states that it would be better for someone to write a good history of the Bible for young people. The book has a section called “On the Worship of God as the Foundation of Virtue,” where Locke recommends teaching children that virtue should be founded on “a true notion of a God, such as the creed wisely teaches, as far as his age is capable, and by accustoming him to pray to him, the next thing to be taken care of, is to keep him exactly to speaking of truth, and by all the ways imaginable inclining him to be good-natured. Let him know, that twenty faults are sooner to be forgiven, than the straining of truth to cover any one by an excuse.”

For Locke, it was clear that all of creation was given to mankind in common. But as God commanded man to subdue the earth, he gave authority to appropriate goods. He was not an anarchist either. To encourage stewardship, “God hath certainly appointed government to restrain the partiality and violence of men.” He also went beyond individualism, as he recognized the existence of the soul and the social nature and needs of human beings: “Every man has an immortal soul, capable of eternal happiness or misery; whose happiness depending upon his believing and doing those things in this life which are necessary to the obtaining of God’s favor, and are prescribed by God to that end.” Elsewhere he added, “There is nothing in this world that is of any consideration in comparison with eternity,” which explains why he devoted so much time to studying religion.

His views on the birth of Jesus were in line with the scriptures. In The Reasonableness of Christianity, Locke touches upon the Christmas story on several occasions. He accepts the narrative of the Gospel: “God nevertheless, out of his infinite mercy, willing to bestow eternal life on mortal men, sends Jesus Christ into the world; who being conceived in the womb of a virgin (that had not known man) by the immediate power of God, was properly the Son of God…. Being the Son of God, he was like the Father, immortal.” He saw Jesus as the Messiah and described the role of Christians as an evangelical one, going through the towns preaching the gospel, the “good news.”

Locke discusses the birth of Jesus in his Paraphrase and Notes on the Epistles of St. Paul (1705-1707)ALEJANDRO CHAFUEN

In Paraphrase and Notes on the Epistles of St. Paul, Locke describes the bewilderment of some of the Jews, who were expecting to be delivered from the power and dominion of strangers. Locke explains, “When our Savior came their reckoning was up; and the Miracles which Jesus did, concurred to persuade them that it was he. But his obscure Birth and mean Appearance, suited not with that Power and Splendor they had phansied to themselves he should come in.”

Locke’s views on religion were the foundation of his views on the human person. Although without question many authors have come to similar conclusions as Locke without having his same theological and religious interests, most of them developed their ideas and understanding in a world made possible by Locke’s contributions. There are many mysteries in Christianity and the Christmas story. The respect shown to them by a champion of logic and reason such as John Locke can help some of us to an even greater enjoyment of these holy celebrations.

 

Alejandro A. Chafuén es Dr. En Economía por el International College de California. Licenciado en Economía, (UCA), es miembro del comité de consejeros para The Center for Vision & Values, fideicomisario del Grove City College, y presidente de la Atlas Economic Research Foundation. Se ha desempeñado como fideicomisario del Fraser Institute desde 1991. Fue profesor de ESEADE.

EL AUTOR LIBERAL POR EXCELENCIA

Por Alberto Benegas Lynch (h)

 

Afortunadamente han existido y existen autores notables que enriquecen la tradición de pensamiento liberal, principalmente desde la Roma del derecho, el common law, la Escolástica Tardía o Escuela de Salamanca, Grotius, Richard Hooker, Pufendorf, Sidney y Locke, la siempre fértil e inspiradora Escuela Austríaca, la rama del Public Choice y tantos pensadores de fuste que alimentan al liberalismo, constantemente en ebullición y que en toda ocasión tiene presente que el conocimiento es provisorio sujeto a refutación según la valiosa mirada popperiana.

 

Nullius in verba -el lema de la Royal Society de Londres- puede tomarse como un magnífico resumen de la perspectiva liberal, no hay palabras finales, lo cual no significa adherir al relativismo epistemológico, ni cultural, ni hermenéutico ni ético ya que la verdad -el correlato entre el juicio y lo juzgado- es independiente de las respectivas opiniones, de lo contrario no solo habría la contradicción de que suscribir el relativismo convierte esa misma aseveración en relativa, sino que nada habría que investigar en la ciencia la cual se transformaría en un sinsentido.

 

También es de gran relevancia entender que el ser humano no se limita a kilos de protoplasma sino que posee estados de conciencia, mente o psique por lo que tiene sentido la libertad, sin la cual no habría tal cosa como proposiciones verdaderas o falsas, ideas autogeneradas, la posibilidad de revisar los propios juicios, la responsabilidad individual, la racionalidad, la argumentación y la moral.

 

Los aportes de liberales, especialmente en el  campo de la economía y el derecho han sido notables pero hay un aspecto que podría reconocerse como el corazón mismo del espíritu liberal que consiste en los procesos evolutivos debidos a las faenas de millones de personas que operan cada uno en su minúsculo campo de acción cuyas interacciones producen resultados extraordinarios que no son  consecuencia de ninguna acción individual puesto que el conocimiento está fraccionado y es disperso.

 

En otros términos, la ilimitada soberbia de planificadores hace que no se percaten de la concentración de ignorancia que generan al intentar controlar y dirigir vidas y haciendas ajenas. Uno de los efectos de esta arrogancia supina deriva de que al distorsionar los precios relativos, afectan los únicos indicadores con que cuenta el mercado para operar y, a su vez, desdibuja la contabilidad y la evaluación de proyectos que inexorablemente se traduce en consumo de capital y, por ende, en la disminución de salarios e ingresos en términos reales. Y como apunta Thomas Sowell, el tema no estriba en contar con ordenadores con gran capacidad de memoria puesto que la información no está disponible ex ante la correspondiente acción.

 

Lorenzo Infantino expone el antedicho corazón del espíritu liberal y lo desmenuza con una pluma excepcional y un provechoso andamiaje conceptual (para beneficio de los hispanoparlantes, con la ayuda de la magistral traducción de Juan Marcos de la Fuente). Las obras más conocidas de Infantino en el sentido que venimos comentando son Ignorancia y libertad y Orden sin plan. Ahora se está traduciendo al castellano otro libro sobre el poder del mismo autor que, en un programa de investigación que explora otros andariveles,  me dicen estará a la altura del magnus opus de Ludwig von Mises: Acción humana. Tratado de economía que ha revolucionado la ciencia en muy diversos aspectos y, por mi parte, agrego que entonces también estará al nivel de los jugosos escritos del excelente jurista Bruno Leoni que pone de manifiesto que el derecho es un proceso de descubrimiento y no de diseño o ingeniería social y de los trabajos del muy prolífico, original y sofisticado Anthony de Jasay quien, entre otras cosas, se ocupa de contradecir los esquemas inherentes a los bienes públicos, free riders, asimetría de la información y el dilema del prisionero.

 

Tiene sus bemoles la pretensión de hacer justicia a un autor en una nota periodística, pero de todos modos transcribo algunos de los pensamientos de Infantino como una telegráfica introducción que a vuelapluma pretende ofrecer un pantallazo de la raíz y del tronco central de la noble tradición liberal.

 

Explica de modo sumamente didáctico los errores de apreciación a que conduce el apartarse del individualismo metodológico e insistir en hipóstasis que no permiten ver la conducta de las personas y ocultarlas tras bultos que no tienen vida propia como “la sociedad”, “la gente” y afirmaciones tragicómicas como “la nación quiere” o “el pueblo demanda”.

 

Desarrolla la idea de Benjamin Constant de la libertad en los antiguos y en  los modernos, al efecto de diferenciar la simple participación de las personas en el acto electoral y similares respecto de la santidad de las autonomías individuales a través de ejemplos históricos de gran relevancia. Infantino se basa y en gran medida desarrolla las intuiciones de Mandeville y Adam Smith en los dos libros mencionados de aquél autor.

 

Asimismo, el autor de marras se detiene a explicar los peligros de la razón constructivista (el abuso de la razón) para apoyarse en la razón crítica. Muestra, entre otras,  las tremendas falencias y desaciertos de Comte , Hegel y Marx en la construcción de los aparatos estatales totalitarios, al tiempo que alude a la falsificación de la democracia (en verdad, cleptocracia). En este último sentido, dado que Hayek sostiene en las primeras doce líneas de la edición original de su Law, Legislation and Liberty que hasta el momento los esfuerzos del liberalismo para ponerle bridas al Leviatán han resultado en un completo fracaso, entonces se hace necesario introducir nuevos límites al poder y no esperar con los brazos cruzados la completa demolición de la libertad y la democracia en una carrera desenfrenada hacia el suicido colectivo.

 

En este sentido, como  ya he escrito en otras oportunidades, hay que prestarle atención a las sugerencia del propio Hayek para el Legislativo, de Leoni para el Judicial y aplicar la receta de Montesquieu para el Ejecutivo, es decir, que el método del sorteo “está en la índole de la democracia”. Mirado de cerca esto último hace que los incentivos sobre cuya importancia enfatizan Coase, Demsetz y North trabajen en dirección a que se establezcan límites estrictos para proteger las vidas, propiedades y libertades de cada uno ya que cualquiera puede gobernar. Además habría que repasar los argumentos de Randolph y Gerry en la asamblea constituyente estadounidense en favor del Triunvirato.

 

Infantino recorre los temas esenciales que giran en torno a los daños que produce la presunción del conocimiento de los megalómanos que arremeten contra los derechos individuales alegando pseudoderechos o aspiraciones de deseos que de contrabando se pretenden aplicar vía la guillotina horizontal bajo la destructiva manía del igualitarismo.

 

Lamentablemente, como ha subrayado Hayek, los fenómenos complejos de las ciencias sociales son contraintuitivos, debe escarbarse en distintas direcciones de la historia, la filosofía, la economía y el derecho para llegar a conclusiones acertadas,  como decía el decimonónico Bastiat hurgar en “lo que se ve y lo que no se ve”.

 

A través de la educación de los fundamentos de los valores y principios de la sociedad abierta se corre el eje del debate para que, en esta instancia del proceso de evolución cultural, los políticos se vean obligados a recurrir a la articulación de discursos distintos, mientras se llevan a cabo debates que apuntan en otras direcciones al efecto de preservar de una mejor manera las aludidas autonomías individuales y escapar de la antiutopía orwelliana del gran hermano y, peor aun, a la de Huxley -sobre todo en la versión revisitada- donde las personas piden ser esclavizadas.

 

Tal vez podamos poner en una cápsula el pensamiento de Infantino con una frase de su autoría: “cuando renunciamos a las instituciones de la libertad y nos entregamos a la presunta omnisciencia de alguien, cubre su totalidad la escala de la degradación y la bestialidad”.

 

Alberto Benegas Lynch (h) es Dr. en Economía y Dr. En Administración. Académico de la Academia Nacional de Ciencias Económicas y fue profesor y primer rector de ESEADE.

MARCOS INSTITUCIONALES: EL ORIGEN

Por Alberto Benegas Lynch (h)

 

Hoy en los países civilizados se da por sentado que los marcos institucionales compatibles con una sociedad abierta resultan esenciales para el progreso. Desarrollos como el tronco principal de las tradiciones de pensamiento de Law & Economics y Public Choice parten de ese supuesto al efecto dar paso a la estrecha vinculación ente el derecho y la economía. Escuelas como la Austríaca y la de Chicago se basan -con criterios distintos- en la estrecha conexión entre esas áreas vitales.

 

Es interesante entonces indagar acerca del origen del tratamiento sistemático de aquellos marcos. Habitualmente se sitúa en John Locke, pero si bien fue un inicio decisivo en la historia no es el origen del referido tratamiento sistemático donde más bien debe ubicarse a Algernon Sidney quien escribió antes que Locke sobre algunos de los mismos temas, aunque una obra no tan ordenada y con divergencias como en el caso del llamado “estado de naturaleza”, el modo de presentar asuntos como la tributación, el abuso de poder en las asambleas populares y el mayor refinamiento por parte de Locke de asuntos como el origen de la propiedad y los poderes del gobierno.

 

Sidney y Locke por conductos separados conspiraron contra Carlos II (que fue repuesto en el trono después de Cromwell), el primero fue sentenciado a muerte mientras que el segundo pudo escapar de Londres antes que se precipitaran los acontecimientos. Por esto es que se demoró hasta 1698 la publicación del libro de Sidney titulado Discources Concerning Government (escrito entre los años 1681 y 1683), quince años después de la muerte de su autor y diez años después de la obra cumbre de Locke, la que como es sabido fue complementada posteriormente por Montesquieu y tantas otras contribuciones hasta el presente.

 

Sin duda que hay antecedentes que se remontan a la antigüedad: las agudas consideraciones de Cicerón 50 AC, los escritos de miembros de la Escolástica Tardía, especialmente los de Francisco Suárez y Francisco de Vitorialos tratados de Richard Hooker y Hugo Grotius y en la práctica del derecho, con suerte diversa, el Código de Hamurabi (circa 1750 AC), los Mandamientos (especialmente el “no matar”, “no robar” y “no codiciar los bienes ajenos”, circa 1250 AC), la democracia ateniense, el common law, el derecho romano, la Carta Magna de 1215 y los Fueros de Aragón de 1283 donde se estableció el juicio de manifestación más de veinte años antes del habeas corpus en Inglaterra (aunque las bases se sentaron con el interdictio,también en la Roma antigua).

 

Sidney escribió su obra también como una refutación a Patriarcha: A Defence of the Natural Power of Kings against the Unnatural Liberty of the People de Robert Filmer. Así, Sidney resume con ironía su posición respecto al derecho divino de los reyes al escribir que “como ha dicho no hace mucho una persona ingeniosa [Richard Rumbold] hay algunos que han nacido con coronas en sus cabezas y todas las demás con monturas sobre sus espaldas”.

 

La obra se divide en tres grandes capítulos subdivididos en secciones en 600 páginas correspondientes a la edición de 1990 (Indianapolis, Indiana, Liberty Fund). En el primer capítulo -especialmente en las secciones quinta y sexta- el autor se detiene a considerar el fundamento de los derechos de las personas quienes a través de la razón y la experiencia descubren lo que está en la naturaleza de las cosas y que las formas de gobierno deben ser consistentes con la protección de esos derechos. En este sentido escribe que “La libertad consiste solamente en la independencia respecto a la voluntad de otros” y “por el nombre de esclavo entendemos a aquel que no puede disponer de su persona ni de sus bienes porque está a la disposición de los deseos de su amo” y subraya la importancia de limitar el poder del gobierno porque “si estuviera dotado de poder ilimitado para hacer lo que le plazca y no fuera restringido por ninguna ley, si se vive bajo tamaño gobierno me pregunto que es la esclavitud”.

 

Sostiene que es un contrasentido utilizarlo a Dios como respaldo de monarquías absolutas y otros gobiernos despóticos que ponen a la par “el gobierno de Calígula con la democracia de Atenas”, ni falsear la interpretación bíblicas para suscribir atropellos al derecho de los gobernados “puesto que la violencia y el fraude no pueden crear derechos” ya que “Aquello que es injusto no puede nunca cambiar su naturaleza” por el hecho de ser un gobierno el que dictamine.

 

En el transcurso del segundo capítulo, Sidney se explaya en la necesidad de normas o reglas generales para la convivencia, lo cual no debe confundirse con decretos reales que avasallan derechos. En esta línea argumental el autor inicia una confrontación con lo que después se denominaría positivismo legal. En este sentido sostiene que el renegar de mojones extramuros de la ley positiva “abjuran” del sentido de las normas justas y las “usurpan lo cual no es más que una violación abominable y escandalosa de las leyes de la naturaleza”.  Destaca que “Aquello que no es justo no es Ley; y aquello que no es Ley no debe ser obedecido” (fórmula tomista). Vincula también la Justicia con la institución de la propiedad en línea con el “dar a cada uno lo suyo”, en cuyo contexto enfatiza que “La propiedad es un apéndice de la libertad; es imposible que un hombre tenga derechos a la tierra y a los bienes si no goza de libertad”.

 

Finalmente, en el tercer y último capítulo surge el tema del derecho de resistencia a los gobiernos opresivos, tema que más adelante fue recogido en la Declaración de la Independencia estadounidense y de todos los gobiernos liberales. En este sentido, declara que “El único fin por el que se constituye un gobierno y por lo que se reclama obediencia es la obtención de justicia y protección, y si no puede proveer ambos servicios, el pueblo tiene el derecho de adoptar los pasos necesarios para su propia seguridad”.

 

Y sigue diciendo que “El magistrado […] es por y para la gente y la gente no es por y para él. La obediencia por parte de los privados está sustentada y medida por las leyes generales y el bienestar de la gente y no puede regirse por el interés de una persona o de unos pocos contra el interés del público. Por tanto, el cuerpo de una nación no puede estar atado a ninguna obediencia que no esté vinculada al bien común”.

 

Concluye que “sería una locura pensar que una nación puede estar obligada a soportar cualquier cosa que los magistrados piensen oportuno contra ella”.

 

Sidney influyó sobre William Penn en cuanto a la necesaria tolerancia y libertad religiosa, quien luego fundó Pennsylvania en Estados Unidos donde propugnó la completa separación entre el poder y la religión como antecedente fundamental para la “doctrina de la muralla” jeffersoniana y bregó por el respeto irrestricto a los derechos individuales.

 

Thomas Jefferson, en carta dirigida a John Trumbull el 18 de enero de 1789 escribió que la obra que comentamos de Sidney “es probablemente el mejor libro sobre los principios del buen gobierno fundado en el derecho natural que haya sido publicado en cualquier idioma”. Y, a su vez, John Adams el 17 de septiembre de 1823 le escribió a Jefferson sobre el mismo libro en donde consigna que constituye “un iluminación en moral, filosofía y política”. Friedrich Hayek en Los fundamentos de la libertad manifiesta que “Entre los puntos que toca Sidney en Discourses Concerning Government, esenciales para nuestro problema [y se refiere a su definición de libertad ya citada en esta artículo]”.

 

El día de su ejecución sus verdugos leyeron párrafos de su Discourses como pretendidas pruebas de su sentencia a muerte y Sidney les entregó una nota en la que, entre otras cosas, subraya que “Vivimos una era en la que la verdad significa traición”.

 

Para cerrar esta nota, recordemos que, como se ha dicho, es el único caso en el que actúan como patrones quienes reciben sus sueldos de otros, es decir, los gobernantes proceden como dueños  cuando son los gobernados los que financian sus emolumentos.

 

Alberto Benegas Lynch (h) es Dr. en Economía y Dr. En Administración. Académico de la Academia Nacional de Ciencias Económicas y fue profesor y primer Rector de ESEADE.